Autore Topic: Chinese Democracy: RECENSIONI della STAMPA  (Letto 51188 volte)

0 Utenti e 1 Visitatore stanno visualizzando questo topic.

Offline Nadia

  • 2002-2012
  • Gunner
  • *
  • Credibilità: 25
  • Anouk saluta i gobbi
    • Slash
    • Contro la Reunion
Chinese Democracy: RECENSIONI della STAMPA
« il: 10 Novembre 2008, 18:02:pm »
In questo topic tutte le review ufficiali delle varie riviste, giornali, siti etc..

ROLLING STONE MAGAZINE

Let's get right to it: The first Guns n' Roses album of new, original songs since the first Bush administration is a great, audacious, unhinged and uncompromising hard-rock record. In other words, it sounds a lot like the Guns n' Roses you know. At times, it's the clenched-fist five that made 1987's perfect storm, Appetite for Destruction; more often, it's the one sprawled across the maxed-out CDs of 1991's Use Your Illusion I and II, but here compressed into a convulsive single disc of supershred guitars, orchestral fanfares, hip-hop electronics, metallic tabernacle choirs and Axl Rose's still-virile, rusted-siren singing.

If Rose ever had a moment's doubt or repentance over what Chinese Democracy has cost him in time (13 years), money (14 studios are listed in the credits) and body count — including the exit of every other founding member of the band — he left no room for it in these 14 songs. "I bet you think I'm doin' this all for my health," Rose cracks through the saturation-bombing guitars in "I.R.S.," one of several glancing references on the album to what he knows a lot of people think of him: that Rose, now 46, has spent the last third of his life running off the rails, in half-light. But when he snaps, "All things are possible/I am unstoppable," in the thumper "Scraped," that's not loony hubris — just a good old rock & roll "fuck you," the kind that made him and the old band hot and famous in the first place.

Something else Rose broadcasts over and over on Chinese Democracy: Restraint is for suckers. There is plenty of familiar guitar firepower — the stabbing-dagger lick that opens the first track, "Chinese Democracy," the sand-devil fuzz in "Riad N' the Bedouins" and the looping squeals over the grand anguish of "Street of Dreams." But what Slash and Izzy Stradlin used to do with two guitars now takes a wall of 'em. On some tracks, Rose has up to five guys — Robin Finck, Buckethead, Paul Tobias, Ron "Bumblefoot" Thal and Richard Fortus — riffing and soloing in broad, saw-toothed blurs. And that's no drag. I still think the wild, superstuffed "Oh My God" — the early Chinese Democracy track wasted on the 1999 End of Days soundtrack — beats everything on Guns n' Roses' 1993 covers album, The Spaghetti Incident?

Most of these songs also go through multiple U-turns in personality, as if Rose kept trying new approaches to a hook or a bridge and then decided, "What the hell, they're all cool." "Better" starts with what sounds like hip-hop voicemail — severely pinched guitar, drum machine and a near-falsetto Rose ("No one ever told me when/I was alone/They just thought I'd know better") — before blowing up into vintage Sunset Strip wallop. "If the World" has Buckethead plucking acoustic Spanish guitar over a blaxploitation-film groove, while Rose shows that he still holds a long-breath vowel — part torture victim, part screaming jet — like no other rock singer.

And there is so much going on in "There Was a Time" — strings and Mellotron, a full-strength choir and Rose's overdubbed sour-growl harmonies, wah-wah guitar and a false ending (more choir) — that it's easy to believe Rose spent most of the past decade on that arrangement alone. But it is never a mess, more like a loud mass of bad memories and hard lessons. In the first lines, Rose goes back to a beginning much like his own — "Broken glass and cigarettes/ Writin' on the wall/It was a bargain for the summer/An' I thought I had it all" — then piles on the wreckage along with the orchestra and guitars. By the end, it's one big melt of missing and kiss-off ("If I could go back in time . . . But I don't want to know it now"). If this is the Guns n' Roses that Rose kept hearing in his head all this time, it is obvious why two guitars, bass and drums were never going to be enough.

It is plain, too, that he thinks this Guns n' Roses is a band, as much as the one that recorded "Welcome to the Jungle," "Sweet Child O' Mine," "Used to Love Her" and "Civil War." The voluminous credits that come with Chinese Democracy certainly give detailed credit where it is due. My favorite: "Initial arrangement suggestions: Youth on 'Madagascar." Rose takes the big one — "Lyrics N' Melodies by Axl Rose" — but shares full-song bylines with other players on all but one track. Bassist Tommy Stinson plays on nearly every song, and keyboardist Dizzy Reed, the only survivor from the Illusion lineup, does the Elton John-style piano honors on "Street of Dreams."

But Rose still sings a lot about the power of sheer, solitary will even when he throws himself into a bigger fight, like "Chinese Democracy." In "Madagascar," which Rose has played live for several years now, he samples both Dr. Martin Luther King's "I have a dream" speech and dialogue from Cool Hand Luke. And at the end of the album, on the bluntly titled "Prostitute," Rose veers from an almost conversational tenor, over a ticking-bomb shuffle, to five-guitar barrage, orchestral lightning and righteous howl: "Ask yourself/Why I would choose/To prostitute myself/To live with fortune and shame." To him, the long march to Chinese Democracy was not about paranoia and control. It was about saying "I won't" when everyone else insisted, "You must." You may debate whether any rock record is worth that extreme self-indulgence. Actually, the most rock & roll thing about Chinese Democracy is he doesn't care if you do.

DAVID FRICKE

http://www.rollingstone.com/reviews/album/24024297/review/24161281/chinese_democracy
« Ultima modifica: 10 Novembre 2008, 18:23:pm da Nadia »

Offline Nadia

  • 2002-2012
  • Gunner
  • *
  • Credibilità: 25
  • Anouk saluta i gobbi
    • Slash
    • Contro la Reunion
Re: Chinese Democracy: RECENSIONI della STAMPA
« Risposta #1 il: 10 Novembre 2008, 18:28:pm »
MESSAGGERO

thanks to Farmer

fonte: il messagero.it
articolo di : Simona Orlando


"ROMA (10 novembre) - I temi trattati nell’atteso Chinese democracy dei Guns N’ Roses (in uscita il 23 novembre su CD, digital download e vinile) sono amori finiti, solitudine, follia del mondo moderno e lasciano intendere che stavolta il leader Axl Rose abbia usato con maggiore impegno la sua penna. Il brano Madagascar, supportato da corni ed archi (gli arrangiamenti orchestrali sono dell’italiano Marco Beltrami), ospita dialoghi tratti dal film Mississippi Burning - Le radici dell’odio, frasi estrapolate dal sermone di Martin Luther King Why Jesus called a man a fool e dal suo celebre discorso del ‘63 I have a dream. Altra citazione appare in Catcher n’ the rye (titolo originale del libro di Salinger Il giovane Holden) che nei versi fa riferimento a Mark David Chapman, l’assassino di John Lennon. Proprio da questo brano è stato estromesso, a sua insaputa, il chiarrista dei Queen Brian May, che sul suo sito ha diplomaticamente scritto: «E’ un peccato, ci ho lavorato molto ed ero orgoglioso del risultato. Ma posso capire che Axl voglia avere un album che riflette il lavoro con i membri attuali della band. Ho i missaggi delle tracce su cui ho suonato le mie chitarre, ma, per rispetto a lui, rimarrano segrete». E’ l’ennesimo caso di collaborazioni finite male. Nel disco abbondano infatti parti suonate da musicisti che non appartengono più alla formazione odierna: il velocissimo chitarrista Buckethead se ne è andato così come Robin Finck dei Nine Inch Nails e Dave Navarro (ex Jane’s Addiction e Red Hot Chili Peppers) e solo a pubblicazione definitiva si renderà comprensibile il ruolo dei tanti personaggi che si sono avvicendati in studio.

A onor del vero non si tratterà della ricomparsa di una band che diserta la scena da diciassette anni come è stato annunciato, ma del ritorno del singolo Axl Rose (e una squadra di musicisti al seguito) che fino ad oggi non ha fatto che dedicarsi al disco. Non è tanto lui, dunque, a creare aspettative, quanto il tempo che ha speso ad assemblare il progetto Chinese democracy: quindici anni di gestazione e oltre tredici milioni di dollari per la realizzazione. Il motivo? Problemi personali, problemi con l’etichetta discografica, problemi legali, continue defezioni dei musicisti scelti, uniti al caratterino del cantante che, si sa, è affetto da perfezionismo maniacale e al Village Recorders di Los Angeles ci ha impiegato cinque anni solo per rodare le parti di batteria.
Il risultato è un album di quattordici tracce, da lui co-prodotte insieme a Caram Costanzo (al lavoro sugli ottimi No Code dei Pearl Jam e Evil Empire dei Rage Against the Machine), più cimelio che primizia perché chi ha seguito i Guns N‘ Roses post-scissione già conosce buona parte della proposta.

Le canzoni sono state affinate nel sound e negli arrangiamenti, ma erano state provate nei concerti e sono reperibili sul web, i fan le hanno addirittura coverizzate, hanno già tirato giù tablature e testi. Inoltre Shackler’s revenge è stata inserita nel videogioco Rock band 2 e If the world (inedita chitarra flamenco e andamento funky) è apparsa sui titoli di coda del film Body of lies, lasciando poco all’immaginazione.

La prima traccia ufficiale Chinese Democracy, segnata da un’introduzione epica, un riff incisivo e la voce raschiata di Axl alla ribalta, è stata accolta positivamente dal pubblico e pur non essendo tipicamente radiofonica si è rapidamente piazzata all’ottavo posto nella classifica dei singoli Mainstream Rock, miglior debutto dopo la fortunatissima Don’t cry. Sorry ospita invece la voce di Sebastian Bach, frontman dei vecchi Skid Row, Street of dreams (conosciuta come il titolo The blues) è una piano ballad pseudo November rain, Rhiad and the bedouins vira al metal, mentre sui brani I.R.S., This I love e Prostitute hanno la meglio Better, prossimo papabile singolo, e There was a time, canzone fra le più apprezzate dagli internauti: dura oltre sette minuti e lascia ampio spazio al virtuosismo chiatarristico di Buckethead, il quale sbroglia un assolo di quasi due minuti

Ad un primo ascolto Chinese democracy è più vicino al regno di Use your illusion che a quello di Appetite for destruction, e anche se non sembra spiccare per originalità, come ha detto Slash, ex chitarrista storico dei Guns: «E’ bello riascoltare la voce di Axl Rose» e sentire chitarre portanti, ormai rare anche nel terreno dell’hard rock. Questo dovrebbe essere il primo capitolo di una trilogia che si concluderà nel 2012 e che vedrà nelle fasi successive un maggiore uso dell’elettronica. Se le vendite non andranno bene, è prevedibile una futura reunion che nessuno del nucleo originario si è sentito di escludere categoricamente."
« Ultima modifica: 10 Novembre 2008, 18:58:pm da Nadia »

Offline Nadia

  • 2002-2012
  • Gunner
  • *
  • Credibilità: 25
  • Anouk saluta i gobbi
    • Slash
    • Contro la Reunion
Re: Chinese Democracy: RECENSIONI della STAMPA
« Risposta #2 il: 10 Novembre 2008, 18:57:pm »
thanks Sax81

Classick Rock

Yeah, it's true. Today, members of the CR team traipsed through the cold November rain to hear the 14 tracks that make up Guns N' Roses' new album Chinese Democracy.

Unfortunately we were also forced to sign a form saying that we agreed to not write – or talk – about the album until November 15.

Last year, as you might remember, we crowned Chinese Democracy 'Album of The Year 2007' on the back of the seven leaked track we'd heard at the time. So were we right?

So… Uh… You know… I mean… Like… Um… We're not allowed to say.

But here's one we made earlier – what we said last year about the leaked tracks [NB to legal people: we're talking about the leaks, not the new album]:

"The music we’ve listened to most this year isn’t available in HMV, through Amazon, or via iTunes. Strictly speaking it shouldn’t even be in the No.1 spot (and so, if it makes anyone feel better, let us stress that, yes, Snakes And Arrows was the best rock album released this year).

But the fact is that these seven leaked tracks (Chinese Democracy, Better, The Blues, IRS, There Was A Time, Madagascar and Catcher In The Rye) have been listened to by thousands (maybe millions) all year – and that anyone who wants them can get them within hours via a host of GN’R messageboards, or by typing “Chinese Democracy torrent” into Google and choosing from one of dozens of sites.

‘Unreleased’? Um, yeah. Right.

This is a unique, unprecedented situation. Decades ago, an unreleased album (the Beach Boys’ Smile, say, or Prince’s ‘Black album’) would inevitably be bootlegged and available at a few market stalls or backstreet record shops around the country. If you were determined and resourceful – and didn’t mind taking a punt on something that could be of dubious quality – you could find them. But even the best, most sought-after bootleg would only sell in the hundreds, maybe thousands. By contrast, these seven MP3 files – which may or may not end up on the official release of Chinese Democracy, and even if they do it’ll probably be in a different form – travelled all around the world in a flash. Exact copies are being emailed back and forth even as you read this, burnt on to CD, copied between networks, ripped to MP3 players. This is bootlegging on an altogether different scale.

We’re not condoning or encouraging this. We’d much rather be writing about an official, finished release – but the genie is truly out of the bottle. And we wouldn’t put it back in even if we could – because these tracks aren’t just some of the best music of the year, they’re the sound of one of rock’s major artists taking on the zeitgeist and winning.

Anyone who thought that Axl was sitting, demented, in a studio somewhere, like the rock equivalent of Jack Nicholson in The Shining (“All work and no play makes Axl a dull boy. All work and no play…” etc) is in for a shock. Axl may be a few sandwiches short of a picnic, but on these songs he’s articulate, passionate, ambitious – seemingly intent on building something epic and grand: genuine 21st-century rock music.

There’s Better: thunderous, funky, and heavy as all hell, with guitar freakouts from Buckethead and a beautiful bluesy outro from Robin Finck counter-balancing Axl’s desperate pleading: ‘I never wanted you to be so full of anger/I never wanted you to be somebody else/I never wanted you to be someone afraid to know themselves/I only wanted you to see things for yourself.’

The Blues [now renamed Street Of Dreams] takes Axl’s love of Elton John-style piano ballads to new heights, without dipping into November Rain-style over-indulgence. If There Was A Time, Catcher… and IRS mine a similar vein, it’s one that’s rich enough to sustain them both and boosted with choirs, strings, guitar solos a-go-go and emoting on a grand scale. The title track, meanwhile, brings it all back to basics: a Smells Like Teen Spirit-style rocker in which Axl sounds like he’s actually having – whisper it – fun.

Madagascar uses samples of a Martin Luther King like a guitar solo, building to its conclusion – ‘Free at last! Free at last! Thank God Almighty, we are free at last!’ – while other samples include that bit from Cool Hand Luke (‘What we got here is a failure to communicate!’) that’s also sampled in Civil War – a reminder that you’re listening to a
work in progress. Madagascar is also the song in which Axl defiantly takes on his nay-sayers: ‘I won’t be told any more/That I’ve been brought down in this storm/And left so far out from the shore that I can’t find my way back…’
We would never have said this a year ago, but on this evidence you’d have to be mad to bet against him."

Will it be Album Of The Year again this year? You'll have to wait and see. Until then, for a full review, see the January issue of Classic Rock, onsale Dec 10 – or check back to this website on November 15.

Offline simo

  • Gunner
  • *
  • Credibilità: 8
  • Il Monaco Pazzo
Re: Chinese Democracy: RECENSIONI della STAMPA
« Risposta #3 il: 10 Novembre 2008, 20:06:pm »
Simona Orlando ha scritto un gran bell'articolo...

Offline Nadia

  • 2002-2012
  • Gunner
  • *
  • Credibilità: 25
  • Anouk saluta i gobbi
    • Slash
    • Contro la Reunion
Re: Chinese Democracy: RECENSIONI della STAMPA
« Risposta #4 il: 10 Novembre 2008, 23:28:pm »
Solo recensioni VERE qua, grazie.

Offline Vincent_Sega

  • Gunner
  • *
  • Credibilità: -2
  • Mentre la notte scendeva stellata, stellata....
Re: Chinese Democracy: RECENSIONI della STAMPA
« Risposta #5 il: 11 Novembre 2008, 01:23:am »
Citazione
E’ l’ennesimo caso di collaborazioni finite male. Nel disco abbondano infatti parti suonate da musicisti che non appartengono più alla formazione odierna: il velocissimo chitarrista Buckethead se ne è andato così come Robin Finck dei Nine Inch Nails e Dave Navarro (ex Jane’s Addiction e Red Hot Chili Peppers) e solo a pubblicazione definitiva si renderà comprensibile il ruolo dei tanti personaggi che si sono avvicendati in studio.


Mi sono perso qualche avvicendamento nella band? Robin Finck?

Offline Nik

  • Chronicles of a Broken Heart
  • Gunner
  • *
  • Credibilità: -32
  • Love is Pain, as Life is Shit
    • Axl
    • Contro la Reunion
Re: Chinese Democracy: RECENSIONI della STAMPA
« Risposta #6 il: 11 Novembre 2008, 01:28:am »
Mi sono perso qualche avvicendamento nella band? Robin Finck?

Robin è in tour con i NIN da qualche tempo, ma non c'è nulla di ufficiale sulla sua posizione rispetto i GNR, quindi per ora è da considerarsi dentro.

Offline paolo.13

  • Gunner
  • *
  • Credibilità: 1
  • A C LINGOTTO
Re: Chinese Democracy: RECENSIONI della STAMPA
« Risposta #7 il: 11 Novembre 2008, 10:00:am »
beh mi sembrano primi feedback positivi...

tes

  • Visitatore
Re: Chinese Democracy: RECENSIONI della STAMPA
« Risposta #8 il: 11 Novembre 2008, 10:17:am »
Sembra un buon inizio...e chi ben comincia...

Garth_Farmer

  • Visitatore
Re: Chinese Democracy: RECENSIONI della STAMPA
« Risposta #9 il: 11 Novembre 2008, 13:54:pm »
Mi sono perso qualche avvicendamento nella band? Robin Finck?

Ufficialmente è nei Guns N' Roses. L'articolo della Orlando che ho postato difatti contiene una inesattezza a riguardo.