Autore Topic: Chinese Democracy: RECENSIONI della STAMPA  (Letto 51179 volte)

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Offline Checkmate

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Re: Chinese Democracy: RECENSIONI della STAMPA
« Risposta #50 il: 19 Novembre 2008, 15:10:pm »
quello che mi colpisce molto delle recensioni è che non si focalizzano sulle solite song, c è a chi piace ITW e shack a chi non garba twat o prosti, io lo vedo come un fatto  positivo perchè danno motivo di discussione e confronto

Offline Makaveli

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Re: Chinese Democracy: RECENSIONI della STAMPA
« Risposta #51 il: 19 Novembre 2008, 15:12:pm »
quello che mi colpisce molto delle recensioni è che non si focalizzano sulle solite song, c è a chi piace ITW e shack a chi non garba twat o prosti, io lo vedo come un fatto  positivo perchè danno motivo di discussione e confronto

non è una cosa positiva, è una cosa normale.

simoirs90

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Re: Chinese Democracy: RECENSIONI della STAMPA
« Risposta #52 il: 19 Novembre 2008, 16:54:pm »
ho comprato Il Giornale....grande pagina!

Offline martyrose

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Re: Chinese Democracy: RECENSIONI della STAMPA
« Risposta #53 il: 19 Novembre 2008, 19:38:pm »
ho da poco letto la recensione di rockol, e devo dire che trovo un po' di contraddizione tra l'analisi brano per brano e il commento finale, in fin dei conti parlano bene di ogni canzone e poi si dice cheè un buon album e poco più.
in realtà credo che in giro i critici abbiano paura a dire che un disco, che per alcuni saràa anche già ascoltato, è comunque un gran disco e secondo la mia opinione sarà apprezzato trasversalmente tra gli amanti di vari generi

^DaNi85^

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^DaNi85^

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Re: Chinese Democracy: RECENSIONI della STAMPA
« Risposta #55 il: 19 Novembre 2008, 22:15:pm »
http://www.billboard.com/bbcom/reviews/album_review_display.jsp?vnu_content_id=1003892755
Chinese Democracy - Guns N' Roses
by Jonathan Cohen

Grunge. Techno. Boy bands. Both President Bushes. These are just a few of the things Guns N' Roses has improbably outlasted in the 17 (!) years since its last album of original music. Almost ever since, lone original member Axl Rose has been working on "Chinese Democracy," which reached mythic status as the album many thought would never materialize. Lo and behold, here it is (as a Best Buy exclusive, no less).

Apparently to make up for lost time, the set is frontloaded with huge-sounding, heavily produced rockers coated in an ultra-modern sheen that contrasts starkly with the stripped-down, freewheeling material of GNR's glory days. Tracks like "Riad N' the Bedouins" have "Appetite for Destruction" bones but exoskeletons dipped in chrome. Rose eventually backs off and lets the songs breathe, with promising results. "Scraped" is a riffy monster in the vein of "Mr. Brownstone"; "Catcher in the Rye" is pure, major-key classic rock; and "This I Love" is a grandiose ballad you can picture Rose playing with a candelabra on the piano lid.

The artist is in fine, ever-changing voice throughout, and there's certainly a ton of musical food for thought here, requiring several listens before the nuances are revealed. Worth the wait? Maybe. Worth a few hours of your time? Definitely.

^DaNi85^

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Re: Chinese Democracy: RECENSIONI della STAMPA
« Risposta #56 il: 19 Novembre 2008, 23:29:pm »
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/arts/main.jhtml?xml=/arts/2008/11/20/bmgnr120.xml

Chinese Democracy by Guns N' Roses: review

The new album by Guns N’ Roses is finally here, but was it worth the 15-year wait – and the $13m spent on making it, asks Andrew Perry

"The most anticipated album ever", runs the advertising slogan for 'Chinese Democracy', the latest opus by the legends of 1980's heavy rock, Guns N' Roses. The record was, indeed, first mooted as long ago as 1993, and has thus been subject to an unparallelled fifteen years' worth of rumour and speculation.

The sounds of silence: Seven other acts who took their time between albums
However, the absence of a word such as "eagerly" in that ad pitch perhaps acknowledges the fact that critics and fans alike have long since given up on the album actually being any good, or even arriving at all.
There has remained, though, a popular fascination in the megalomania of its orchestrator, the band's singer, Axl Rose. Not long after recording was underway, Rose fired all of his original band mates, who included the elite-class guitar hero, Slash. Since then, he has been through eight or more producers (including Moby, Youth and Queen's Roy Thomas Baker), and hired-and-fired countless replacement musicians.

Two years ago, studio costs were pegged at a staggering $13 million. Yet, finally, 'Chinese Democracy' is just hours away from release, and the music industry, beleaguered by illegal downloading as well as pre-recessionary fears, is hastily gearing up to welcome Rose back as some kind of bandana-clad messiah.

Though almost entirely absent for a decade and a half, Guns N' Roses remain one of rock's biggest names. The band's magnificent debut album, 1987's 'Appetite For Destruction', remains boundlessly influential for its harnessing of punk-rock attitude and heavy-metal riffola. Back then, in the PC-crazed Eighties, Guns N' Roses single-handedly resurrected old-school rock 'n' roll values, as Rose sang about his drug-fuelled nocturnal lifestyle in Los Angeles.

The band soon faltered. In 1991, amid spiralling narcotics habits, they simultaneously released two double-albums, 'Use Your Illusion I & II', which sold spectacularly, but were hopelessly overblown and lacking in good tunes.

Ever a volatile and abusive frontman, Rose's brittle ego went into meltdown circa 1993, when his girlfriend, the model Stephanie Seymour, left him for a multi-millionaire businessman. Within three years, he'd banished all his erstwhile compadres, discovered New Age mysticism, and seldom left his mansion in Malibu.

In rare interviews, he would claim that his creative vision for the next Guns N' Roses album was so mind-blowingly futuristic, that he'd had to despatch the old Gunners, because they only wanted to jam on old Aerosmith riffs.

However, Rose's occasional live tours with the reconstituted GN'R found him trading on nostalgia for 'Appetite For Destruction'. New songs drifted by virtually unnoticed. His replacements for Slash were also iffy: one, known as Buckethead, performed masked, with a KFC Chicken bucket on his head; another, called Bumblefoot, had a foot-shaped guitar, which sprouted wings, mid-solo. Axl himself appeared overweight, and botox-featured, and made frequent visits to the wings, where he reportedly inhaled from an oxygen tank.

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For the past few years, the album has been held up, while lawyers disentangled the possible claims of all those who'd contributed. A guitar solo on the title track by Queen's Brian May, for instance, has been removed, wholesale.

Finally hearing 'Chinese Democracy' for the first time, under heavy guard at GN'R's UK record company, is a surreal experience. How can it ever live up to the legend, or justify its ludicrous gestation period?

Needless to say, it can't, but it is a remarkable and often exhilarating album. Across the 71 minutes, there are only the vaguest hints of the Nine Inch Nails-style industrial sound, with which Rose was reputedly toying. Instead, the music is densely layered, obviously using the computer programme ProTools. A vast armoury of instrumentation - strings, brass, programmed drums, synthesizers, samples, lots of piano (Rose's instrument), as well as traditional rock guitar/bass/drums - is crammed in there, often on the same track. The most immediately satisfying ones are punchier, punky numbers like 'Scraped', or the hi-tech, poppy confection, 'If The World'. 'There Was A Time', on the other hand, feels like a Bond theme, full of melodrama, but it doesn't half go on.

Generally, the songs are epic, long-winded, cleverly stitched together, and subject to constant mood swings - much like Axl himself. Rose sings in many voices - sneering, raging, crowing, opening his battered heart.

Yet his presence, beyond question, is phenomenal, unrivalled in contemporary rock.

On that strength alone, 'Chinese Democracy' deserves to sell a good few million, if not the 28 million accrued by GN'R's debut. For that, it would need a 'Sweet Child O' Mine' or a 'Paradise City' - a box which remains unticked. Worse, Rose writes like a man who hasn't glimpsed reality for many moons. His songs are no longer about universal experiences like going out on the lash, or simply falling for a babe. Most, such as the mewling 'This I Love', are transparently and vindictively addressed to Stephanie Seymour. One can only hope that the album's completion, coupled with a fresh blast of stadium adulation, will finally help him get over her.

^DaNi85^

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Re: Chinese Democracy: RECENSIONI della STAMPA
« Risposta #57 il: 20 Novembre 2008, 12:18:pm »

Garth_Farmer

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Re: Chinese Democracy: RECENSIONI della STAMPA
« Risposta #58 il: 20 Novembre 2008, 14:40:pm »
"Miracolo, risorgono i Guns N'Roses"

di MARINELLA VENEGONI
fonte: LASTAMPA.IT Musica
pubblicato: 19/11/2008


Una sola leggenda era ormai in circolazione nel rock, legata alle pazzie di un’epoca che si è dissolta. Era quella di Chinese Democracy, l’album che Axl Rose, 46 anni, leader dei Guns N’Roses (e ormai unico componente originale della band con il tastierista Dizzy Reed) stava riscrivendo da 15 anni, tanto che si dice che i costi di lavorazione siano nel frattempo saliti a 13 milioni di dollari. Roba da tela di Penelope. Ma ora quel disco già saccheggiatissimo in rete esiste e anzi uscirà in Italia il 21 novembre: sulla copertina seppiata, una bici d’epoca da panettiere, appoggiata a un muro dov’è scritto il nome della band.

Rispetto ai celebrati e antichissimi cinque album precedenti (gli ultimi due del ‘91), è come se i Gunners di un tempo fossero diventati grandi. Dei 14 brani, tutti firmati Rose con vari collaboratori, il più debole sembra proprio la title-track che ha appena esordito nelle radio. Avendo ascoltato dal vivo nel 2006 a Madrid uno spolmonatissimo Axl, sembra impossibile ritrovarlo qui ora, certo con la tonalità più bassa, ma ancora alle prese con il suo falsetto, anche se un po’ spompato, e con i caratteristici toni striduli. Ma comunque capace di sparare le sue cartucce facendosi largo fra micidiali schitarrate (di sei chitarristi, ma non di Slash...) che popolano pezzi rock e due scatenati titoli punk da pogo, Scraped e Riad N’the Bedouins, dove dice di fregarsene del problema mediorientale («Perché sono matto»). Ci sono blues, incipit orientaleggianti, distorsioni, qualche ardito dialogo fra violini e batteria; Madagascar è una sorta di sinfonia che sottende un collage di frasi fra le quali «I have a dream» dalla voce di Martin Luther King. Fra le ballads di Axl al piano, è struggente This is Love. Fra recriminazioni, confessioni, disillusioni, provocazioni, sembra proprio che Axl sia uscito dal tunnel e possa andare avanti.

^DaNi85^

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Re: Chinese Democracy: RECENSIONI della STAMPA
« Risposta #59 il: 21 Novembre 2008, 01:05:am »
Guns N Roses - Chinese Democracy (Geffen)

After 15 years of album silence and a revolving line-up of drummers that would make Spinal Tap blush, Guns N' Roses are back, and this time it seems like they might actually stick around.

The album, as a whole, is a musical journey throughout the bands turbulent past and uncertain future. For the first time since 1987, Guns N' Roses are at the mercy of a record buying public, and it's their current output (aside from their image and touring) that defines their future activities.

'Catcher In The Rye' and 'Street Of Dreams' echo back to 'November Rain' and show the listener that Axl has not forgotten his romantic past. Alternatively, songs such as 'I.R.S.' retain the power and force of 'You Could Be Mine', and prove that the fire is still burning. The biggest departure from the band's original sound is 'Shackler's Revenge' and 'Rhiad and the Bedouins'; they are both heavy, industrial tracks, with overlaying percussion and effects throughout, as well as pacey vocals that can be compared to the song 'Garden of Eden' from Use Your Illusion 1.

Strangely, it's the recently departed Buckethead who makes the biggest impact: his guitar work is intact and impressive-sounding on overdrawn rock concertos such as 'If The World', 'There Was A Time' and 'Prostitute'. Other duties are shared between NINs man Robin Finck, Bumblefoot, Paul Tobias and Richard Fortus. Drums are split between Frank Ferrer and Brain Mania. Bass duties come from Tommy Stintson, with secondary bass from percussionist Chris Pitman. Rounding off the group is Dizzy Reed, who has been with GNR since 1990, and retains his spot on keyboards. It's a huge roster, and just to show Axl isn't a bad sport, he himself plays guitar on the track 'There Was A Time'.

Some songs spin off in several directions, ending like a rendition of the Beatles' 'Hey Jude', with constant repeating and soloing before echoing off slowly into the distance. Other tracks, like the Pink Floyd inspired 'Sorry', are an interesting blend of cosmic rock and doom metal. Like all albums, its best some tracks are left off, and on this album only one track - Scraped - springs to mind.

Overall, 71 minutes of GNR mayhem and madness that's sure to remind you, whether you like it or not, that Guns N Roses are back!

Rating: 5/5

http://www.dailymusicguide.com/Reviews/guns_n_roses_axl_rose_robin_finck_chris_pitman_19112008_0954.aspx